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WHAT IS THE MAGIC WORK TRIANGLE IN THE KITCHEN?

WHAT IS THE MAGIC WORK TRIANGLE IN THE KITCHEN?

Work Out Your Workflow

My children gave me a Fitbit surge for my birthday. It buzzes and vibrates when you have walked 10,000 steps in a day and stars burst onto the screen. It feels good. You don’t really want the distances you cover in the kitchen to add too substantially to this daily count.

THE MAGIC TRIANGLE

The kitchen work triangle is a concept used to create efficient kitchen layouts. Take a little time to notice the 3 main points between which you move in the kitchen. You will almost undoubtedly find that the main kitchen tasks are carried out between the oven, the fridge and the sink. The imaginary lines between these points are what kitchen experts and designers call the work triangle - or magic triangle as I prefer.

SMOOTH AND SEAMLESS

Moving between these points should feel easy and logical. However beautiful a kitchen design might be, if it doesn’t function well it will start niggling at you. When planning a kitchen remodel, discuss the triangle with your Pasadena kitchen contractor and get him to to measure along the lines suggested by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA) below. The larger the kitchen, the more these measurements will be. The suggestions below will give you good idea of whether your triangle will work.

NKBA RECOMMENDATIONS

The NKBA suggests these guidelines for work triangles:

  • The sum of the work triangle's three sides should not exceed 26 feet, and each leg should measure between 4 and 9 feet.
  • The work triangle should not cut through an island or peninsula by more than 12 inches.
  • If the kitchen has only one sink, it should be placed between or across from the cooking surface, preparation area, or refrigerator.
  • No major traffic patterns should cross through the triangle.

I love the last point about the traffic patterns - visions of busy freeways come to mind. Joking aside, it is a really important point. Imagine taking a hot pot of pasta over to the sink to drain only to have a barrage of children hurtling through the sanctified space.

KEEP WHAT WORKS

When doing a kitchen renovation, don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. Keep the things that work. In the end, your lifestyle should determine the functionality of your kitchen rather than a set of rules. However sticking pretty closely to the triangle will help you with space planning.

By Jane Noble